e-prevention and risk reduction in festive environments
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Gonorrhea

Gonorrhea is an infection caused by a bacterium, “Neisseria Gonorrhoeae” or gonococcus.

In recent years, it has been on the rise in the gay community.

Transmission

During oral sex (bacteria can lodge in the mouth or throat) or unprotected anal sex.

Know more, risk less

What are the symptoms?
They appear a few days after contamination:
– The most common is acute urethritis, with burning sensations when urinating (the infamous clap!), pus discharge from the head of the penis, inflammation of the urethra. A sado-masochistic session really is nothing compared to that!
– Less frequently: irritation of the anus and/or rectum (proctitis) with the possibility of discharge.
– The infection can also be located in the throat (pharyngitis).
Be careful, there may be no symptoms at all…

Can this be cured?
Yes, with antibiotics, by injection or orally. If untreated, gonorrhea can infect the testicles (swelling and pain, with a high risk of sterility), the prostate (prostatitis) and cause joint pain (gonococcal arthritis).

Where and when to consult?
Regularly, as part of a sexual health check-up, especially if you have many partners, and quickly in the event of pus, urethritis, proctitis… The tests are performed on a urine sample, a urethral, rectal, or a throat sample. You can consult with your doctor, go to a specialized health centre or a CeGIDD1.

How to prevent gonorrhea with oral sex?
While you’re on treatment, avoid blowjobs. Notifying your partners will allow them to be treated if necessary and will prevent you from becoming infected again. The condom remains the best protection against the risk of gonorrhea transmission.

1 Centre Gratuit d’Information, de Dépistage et de Diagnostic

In partnership with
IN CASE OF AN EMERGENCY
• In any case call or have somebody call 112 or 15 (in France)
• if the person is conscious :
- keep him/her awake by talking to her.
• if the person is uncounscious : undo his/her tight clothes, check if he/she’s breathing and put him/her in recovery position
• stay with him/her until emergency services arrive and inquire about the location of a defibrillator